First Amendment News

Media stumbled in covering Biden’s mental fitness

Brian Stelter in Vox, July 3, 2024, writes that as some Republicans think the media was not covering President Joe Biden’s mental fitness, it is not the case. But he thinks the media failed to cover the issue aggressively. Part of the problem was that the Biden administration went to extreme measures to discourage reporting on the topic. Still reporters failed to highlight evidence of Biden’s decline. David Bauder of The Associated Press in ABC

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One lawsuit settled in Marion, Kansas raid on newspaper

The city of Marion, Kansas that conducted a police raid of the Marion County Record settled one of five federal lawsuits when a former reporter accepted a $235,000 settlement. (The Associated Press, July 5, 2024, by John Hanna) During the raid, the police chief seized Deb Gruver’s cell phone and injured her finger while serving her a search warrant. (The Kansas City Star, July 6, 2024, by Ilana Arougheti)

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Mississippi Pulitzer winner faces jail over order to reveal sources

Anna Wolfe is facing jail in Mississippi for her role in reporting on welfare fraud as the former governor Phil Bryant is suing her and her editor for defamation. The reporting won her a Pulitzer Prize, but now a court order requires her to turn over files including the names of her sources. (NBC News, July 2, 2024, by Ken Dilanian and Laura Strickler) Her editor Adam Ganucheau writes that Bryant is not contesting the

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Supreme Court declines hearing on case of student suing Snapchat

The U.S Supreme Court refused to hear a case determining if a student can sue Snapchat for its role in sexual abuse by a teacher. The company’s lawyers told the court, ““Snapchat is no more responsible for the teacher’s criminal acts than the phone company that hosted her text messages to petitioner or the car that drove the teacher to school.” (USA TODAY, July 2, 2024 by Maureen Groppe) A 36-year-old teacher, now serving a

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Supreme Court limits state censorship of social media platforms

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that social media platforms are like traditional publishers and therefore entitled to First Amendment protections in moderating content. Texas and Florida passed laws regulating content moderation of social media companies out of concern that the platforms were restricting conservative viewpoints, but the court stated “the government cannot get its way just by asserting an interest in better balancing the marketplace of ideas.” (The Verge, July 1, 2024, by Lauren Feiner)

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