Search Results for: Salaries of public employees – Page 179

Opinion: Son of late Nevada governor harassing reporter in court

Jeff Guinn, the son of the late Nevada Governor Kenny Guinn, is so unhappy with the reporting of a lawsuit brought against him by investors that he is suing the reporter claiming she was bribed with personal favors to pursue the story. The problem is that even after losing in lower court, Guinn has appealed to the state Supreme Court, in effect, creating a disincentive for reporters to aggressively report the news in the public’s

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Manning defense team says secrecy demolishes chances of fair trial

Attorneys for Pfc. Bradley Manning, charged with espionage for leaking classified documents to WikiLeaks, are charging that the federal prosecutors are withholding documents needed for a defense. Manning’s attorneys say that they have been frustrated in their attempts to gain access to official “damage assessments” that provide details on the actual damages of the leaks to national security. -db From the Courthouse News Service, April 23, 2012, by Adam Klasfeld. Full story  

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Social media dealing with Russian lies over invasion of Ukraine

Ukraine is pleading with social media companies to take strong measures to restrict access to services within Russia, stop the spread of lies and put the whammy on Russian-backed news outlets. The prime ministers of Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia sent a letter to Google, Facebook and Twitter noting their efforts to curtail Russian lies but asking for a greater effort to suspend accounts that deny or rationalize war crimes and crimes against humanity. (The

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ACLU asks for more transparency in disclosing legal rulings on federal surveillance

The American Civil Liberties Union has commented on new rules by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court regarding public access to court records by asking the FISC to disclose records of significant rulings. -db American Civil Liberties Union Press Release October 4, 2010 NEW YORK – The American Civil Liberties Union today submitted comments on new rules recently proposed by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) regarding public disclosure of court records. The ACLU urged the

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California: Too quick may mean open meeting violation by Sacramento City Council

The Sacramento City Council may have violated the Brown Act, California’s open meeting law, when it quickly adopted a plan for Sacramento redistricting  at its August 9 meeting, writes Melissa Corker for the Sacramento Press. Corker says the council suddenly presented a new map for redistricting after months of work by a citizens’ advisory committee and passed it with a 6-3 vote, prompting speculation about whether a majority of the council had met behind closed

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Charlottesville debacle prompts discussion of limits to free speech

Three U.S. Supreme Court decisions provide rules for groups wanting to speak and demonstrate in public spaces on highly charged issues such as racial discrimination. In the 1969 Brandenburg v Ohio decision, the justices said,  “Freedoms of speech and press do not permit a State to forbid advocacy of the use of force or of law violation except where such advocacy is directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite

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Muhammad Ali a central figure in unfolding of First Amendment rights

Muhammad Ali, the former world heavyweight boxing champion, “embodies the essence of the First Amendment,” writes David L. Hudson Jr., of the First Amendment Center. Hudson shows how Ali was at the “vortex of…First Amendment freedoms,” freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly and petition.  -db From a commentary for the First Amendment Center, January 21, 2012, by David L. Hudson Jr. Full story

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Federal judge opens door for release of records in Giffords shooting

The Washington Post said it was a “positive development” when a federal district judge said the U.S. Attorney’s office could review the records in the Tucson shootings in January that killed six and wounded 13 including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, and after redacting any private or confidential information, could release them to the media. Under a previous court order, the federal prosecutors argued they had no obligation to review the records. -db From The Reporters Committee

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Tabloid gossip threatens credibility of mainstream journalism

The sight of the mainstream media picking up tabloid speculation about a Will and Jada Pinkett Smith breakup is distubing, writes Mary Elizabeth Williams in a commentary for Salon, “…the Smith story…illuminates how utterly pathetic the mainstream media’s mania for headlines has become. Just toss up any old dubious report, and if you’re really butt-covering, tack a question mark at the end of it. You’ve got a story!” In a desperate attempt to fill space,

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First Amendment sidelined in defunding of Planned Parenthood in Ohio

The Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that Ohio could cut its funding of Planned Parenthood because it conducts abortions. The court ruled that the Ohio law defunding abortion services “does not violate the Constitution because the affiliates do not have a due process right to perform abortions.” (Politico, March 12, 2019, by Alice Miranda Ollstein) The court majority did not consider the First Amendment argument, that the withdrawal of funding violated the free

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Trump’s calling media ‘enemy of the people’ triggers strong reactions

Citing anonymous source stories, President Donald Trump’s Chief of Staff Reince Priebus said on “Face the Nation” that the president was sincere in blasting the press as the people’s enemy. Priebus named two problematic stories, the New York Times report that Trump aides had several contacts with Russian intelligence during last year’s election and a Wall Street Journal article about U.S. intelligence keeping sensitive information from the president to keep it from being leaked. (The

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Justice Department seizure of reporter’s records jolts free press

In a sudden reversal of policy, the Justice Department seized the phone and e-mail records of a New York Times reporter continuing an aggressive stance begun under the Obama administration. Prosecutors seized Ali Watkins’ records as part of an investigation of a former Senate Intelligence Committee aide, James A. Wolfe, arrested for lying to investigators in an investigation of the leak of classified documents. (The New York Times, June 10, 2018, by Michael M. Grynbaum)

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FBI closes investigation of documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras

The FBI closed its six year long investigation of an award-winning documentary filmmaker after failing to find any crime or threat to national security. During the six years, the government subjected Laura Poitras to numerous border searches and interrogations. Airport delays numbered over 50 from 2006 to 2012. Poitras and the EFF contend that she was singled out for her films about post-9-11 life in Yemen and Iraq that ran counter to the U.S. government

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Hallmark settles with Paris Hilton over uncompensated use of her image

Paris Hilton settled a lawsuit with Hallmark over Hallmark’s use of her image and a trademarked catchphrase, “That’s hot,” in a greeting card. First Amendment advocates said the settlement had dire implications for free expression. -db The Kansas City Star September 27, 2010 By Diane Stafford She may be famous for being famous, but she still has a right to control some uses of her face, name and trademarks. Paris Hilton and Hallmark Cards Inc.

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Federal appeals court blocks release of video by anti-abortion group

The 9th Circuit backed an injunction against anti-abortion proponents from releasing secret recordings of abortion providers. The anti-abortion group had signed an agreement not to distribute any information from the meeting without consent from the providers, the National Abortion Federation. The court ruled the information was obtained through fraud. The anti-abortion group said the information was newsworthy so they had a right to release the recordings since they contained evidence of crimes.  A federal district

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House bill would require judicial oversight of phone record seizure

The Justice Department would have to obtain federal court approval to seize telephone and e-mail records from journalist under a House of Representatives bill proposed by a bipartisan groups of legislators. (The Hill, May 22, 2013, by Jordy Yager) The Electronic Freedom Foundation (EFF) argues that the bill is only a partial fix and that in seeking permission for the records, the government should have to show probable cause under the Fourth Amendment. EFF also

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Bush e-mails: Federal court rules White House office records secret

A U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that the White House Office of Administration is not subject to the Freedom of Information Act and does not have to release records pertaining to the disappearance of millions of Bush administration e-mails. -DB CBS News May 19, 2009 By Stephanie Condon A White House office will not have to publicly release its records relating to the disappearance of millions of e-mails from the Bush administration, a federal appeals

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Professor loses free speech case against University of Colorado

The Colorado Supreme Court ruled against a professor who wanted to sue the University of Colorado for firing him. The school upheld the right of Ward Churchill, an American Indian studies professor, to make what many thought were outrageous statements about the victims of 9/11 but found multiple instances of academic misconduct including plagiarism and falsehoods in his academic writings. -db From the Courthouse News Service, September 12, 2012, by Jonny Bonner. Full story  

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White House press briefings in peril: Trump White House increases lack of access

President Donald Trump has effectively shut down White House press briefings while casting blame on the media for his move. He repeated his criticism of the press as rude purveyors of fake news. (Salon, January 22, 2019, by Shiro Tarlo) The White House Correspondents’ Association said the failure to hold daily briefings was a “retreat from transparency and accountability [that] sets a terrible precedent. Being able to question the press secretary or other senior government

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