Search Results for: 54952(b) standing ad hoc

A&A: How does the Brown Act Apply to ‘Ad Hoc’ Versus ‘Standing’ Committees?

Q: Please explain how the Brown Act applies to “ad hoc” versus “standing” committees of municipal government-appointed commissions. As a threshold matter, California’s Ralph M. Brown Act applies to any committee of a legislative body that is empowered to make decisions, rather than simply advise.  It is only advisory committees that may be exempt from the Brown Act. See Gov. Code section 54952(a)-(b). As to advisory committees, the Brown Act applies to “standing committees,” but not to “ad hoc

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City Clerk requires Ad Hoc reports to be in announcements

Q:Why would our city clerk require city Commissions to move all ad hoc reports and standing committees from agenda items to the announcements portion of the meeting? They are not listed on the agenda unless the ad hoc specifies the exact language of the action/recommendation for our city council. Then it gets more complicated because an agency of the city can be listed on the agenda but a standing committee from one of the neighborhood

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A&A: Budget committee meets behind closed doors

Q: Our county budget committee meets behind closed doors and keeps no written records of meetings. County staff says it’s OK because the budget committee is an ad hoc committee. They say they can designate ANY committee as an ad hoc committee and meet behind closed doors. A: Government Code section 54952(b) contains the definition of agencies that are covered by the Brown Act: “A commission, committee, board or other body of a local agency,

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Southern California: Long running ad hoc committees trample open government

With 14 ad hoc committees, one four years old, the Highland City Council is needlessly conducting vast amounts of the people’s business behind closed doors, says an editorial in the Highland Community News. -DB Highland Community News Editorial December 17, 2009 Ad hoc committees can serve a very useful purpose. Operating out of public view, they can sometimes work out difficult and challenging problems meeting one-on-one with those involved in controversial items. Ad hoc committees are

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A&A: Are school district “fact-finding” committee meetings public?

Q: One of the school districts I cover is considering closing a school. At first the superintendent announced they were closing a school at a board meeting, but after a huge amount of public uproar he backpedaled and said there would be public hearings before a decision is made. The district has set up a fact-finding committee to look at things like declining enrollment numbers in the area, fiscal impact and the impact on academic

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A&A: Is a Coordinating Committee exempt from the Brown Act?

Q: The elected Community Advisory Group, created under the Planning Department of my County, convenes a coordinating sub-committee to review the Advisory Group’s standing rules. The Coordinating Committee chairman does not follow Brown Act obligations (e.g. requirements for notice, agenda, etc.) because he maintains that the Committee is Ad Hoc. Is the Coordinating Committee subject to the stipulation of the Brown Act?  [su_button url=”https://firstamendmentcoalition.org/legal-hotline” target=”blank” style=”flat” background=”#3df60e” color=”#0b0707″ size=”5″ wide=”yes” center=”yes” radius=”0″ desc=”Click Here!” class=”div

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A&A: Ad hoc committees under the Brown Act

Ad hoc committees under the Brown Act Q: Our city council is creating a council “ad hoc” subcommittee derived of two of its members over the issue of economic revitalization. An “ad hoc” council subcommittee is by definition one that does not have to allow the public to attend its meetings. In our city, these “ad hoc” council subcommittees often have special meetings with target groups and in essence end up being propaganda machines or

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A&A: Does the Brown Act apply to city council appointed committees?

Q:  Does the Brown Act apply to city council appointed committees?  If it does, how is a city supposed to conduct the necessary extended deliberations critical to producing good decisions regarding (among other things) public services and expenditures of public funds? A: Whether the Brown Act’s meeting requirements apply to committees created by the city council depends on whether the particular committee may be defined as a “legislative body.” Under the Brown Act, a “legislative body”

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Plumas County forms ad hoc committee to skirt open meeting law

The Plumas County Board of Supervisors formed an ad hoc committee to consider a Feather River College for a “temporary transfer” of funds not over $5 million. The supervisors want to expedite action on the request, and ad hoc committees do not have to give notice of meetings and post agendas in advance. -db Plumas County News September 22, 2010 By Joshua Sebold The Board of Supervisors approved the formation of an ad hoc committee

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Ukiah: Supervisors consider appointing ad-hoc committee on retiree health insurance

The County Board of Supervisors is considering appointing an ad-hoc committee to consider ways to preserve health benefits for retirees but some supervisors think the issue is too important to discuss  behind closed doors. -DB The Ukiah Daily Journal January 27, 2010 By Tiffany Revelle Conflict about forming an ad-hoc committee to study available choices was the sticking point in a Tuesday debate about how to preserve health benefits for county retirees. Supervisor John McCowen’s

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A&A: Are city council subcommittees Brown Act-exempt?

Q: I am trying to get some skeleton data on a new crop of Brown Act-exempt City Council subcommittees. I requested the subcommittees’ mission statements, which I assumed were set out prior to commencement. Some have had four meetings thus far, and one as many as seven meetings. I have not received a response regarding the composition and purpose of the subcommittees with purported need to await an absent city manager’s writing up of, or coming

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Santa Clarita: Community alleges open meeting violation in vote on public library

A group of library workers and patrons in Santa Clarita has demanded that the City Council rescind its vote on withdrawing from the Los Angeles County Library System and allow public discussions of the withdrawal. -db The Santa Clarita Valley Signal September 28, 2010 By Natalie Everett Library patrons and workers sent the city of Santa Clarita a letter Tuesday demanding that the City Council take back its vote on withdrawing from the Los Angeles

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A&A: Can A School District Bar The Public From School Closure Meetings?

Q: I am a parent of an elementary school student who is attending a public school being fast-tracked to close in 25 days. An important piece of this decison-making process is a report that is being written by a superintendent’s advisory committee. This committee has closed meetings and the school board allows this. I have asked for the public to be able to view the meetings, to observe, but this has been denied. The superintendent’s

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CA Sunshine Ordinances: Riverside

Open Government Provisions as codified in the City of Riverside’s Charter Sec. 201.  Access to public meetings and public records. City agencies, boards, commissions, committees, officials, staff and officers, including the Mayor and members of the City Council, exist to conduct the people’s business.  It is fundamental that the people have full access to information, not to just what decisions have been made in their name but how those decisions were reached and how they

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A&A: Park & Rec “advisory committee” keeping its advice secret

Q: 1. Can the (recently appointed) president of a Park and Recreation board form a “Management Committee” without approval of the full Board when one of the (two) members of said Committee is a public member? 2. This “Committee” met with representatives of several public and possibly private (non-profit) organizations without publically reporting who they met with, when, or the topic of discussion. We do know they met with an individual associated with an individual

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A&A: Are Community Action Agencies Subject to the Brown Act?

Q: You would think that Community Action Agencies (nonprofit 501c3) would be subject to the Brown Act since they were created under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, are required to have one-third of their board made up of elected officials, and receive huge amounts of federal and state tax payer monies, etc. But a local newspaper here told us they are not. Can you settle this? A: A “legislative body” is subject to the Brown

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The CPRA, the Brown Act and Retirement Trusts

The CPRA, the Brown Act and Retirement Trusts Q: An employee retirement trust is delegated the responsibility of providing and administering retiree health benefits by our school district.  The unions appoint four individuals, the district appoints four and it is unclear who appoints the two retirees on the board (10 board members total).  I filed PRAs last year, they responded to first one and then stopped responding.  I went to three public board meetings last

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A&A: Is a city’s Building Board of Appeals a standing committee?

Q: I am trying to determine the requirements for a City Building Board of Appeals. Every city is required to have a Building Board of Appeals (BBA) pursuant to the California Building Code. Members of the BBA are appointed by City Council. The BBA only meets when someone files an appeal of a City-approved demolition or building permit. As a result, the BBA can’t anticipate meetings and approve or adopt a meeting schedule in advance. Section

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A&A: Advisory committee subject to Brown Act?

Advisory committee subject to Brown Act? Q: If the air quality district appoints an advisory committee to oversee an air toxics program that will go on for 2-3 years, and it has no members from the Board of Directors (only staff, public citizens), are their meetings subject to the Brown Act? If so, do all the notice, public comment rules apply? A: Assuming that the “advisory committee” were created by a “charter, ordinance, resolution or

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A&A: Regulations on public comment

Regulations on public comment Q: Our City Council’s Law & Legislation Committee recently heard a proposal whereby the Chair (Vice Mayor), expressed her support for the measure, and restricted opposing testimony.  She allowed all those (dozen) in support to testify, and then limited opposition to 1 statement of 2 minutes.  All others who were signed up to testify were not allowed to.  She then browbeat the committee into not voting on the measure, and breaking

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